Speaking on Writing

For more information, click here to complete my SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT SURVEY.

Writing-based topics:

  • How to Be a Zebra on Social Media: No two zebras are striped the same. Neither are creative people. They are however, a social group. So are your readers. Your audience seeks something unique, and it’s up to you to provide that for them. Learn to celebrate your individuality, and use it to build your community. 
  • Come Alive and Stay Wild!: Writing is about grabbing the reader’s attention, and telling the story only you can tell. Embrace your personality and experiences, and let them flow into the characters you write. I cover different ways to write (organic v. outline), better self-talk, and how to recognize triggers to writer’s block and other distractions, to turn you into the writer you are supposed to be.
  • A Time to Write: Editing Fiction the Ecclesiastes Way: We all know great stories are balanced with conflict, emotion, action. Ecclesiastes is, too, and is one of the most well-known passages in the Bible. Are you heavy on conflict without resolution? Do you need to add a little grit? Is there enough on your character’s teeter-totter to keep it in motion? Take a fresh look at your manuscript and see how it compares.
  • Don’t Be an Aspiring Author: Self-talk can limit your achievements. Step outside the confines of your own box to understand how you are already on your way to being a better writer. We’ll include brainstorming ideas for writing, how to maintain a personal schedule to allow time for writing, and ways to keep a positive attitude while moving forward with your writing.
  • Equally Yoked Writers: Being on a level playing field doesn’t mean everyone’s on the same level. Teams are constructed with leaders, boosters, players, and managers. With this topic, we’ll discuss our individual and community roles for growing into, and helping others become, better writers. Topics include social media connections, building your support circle, maintaining relationships not networks, and being tethered to those we can help, and those who can help us.
  • Don’t Be a Blockhead: What is writers block? How does it affect us professionally and personally? When will it be over? We all have different methods of coping with this dark abyss. Let’s work together to recognize triggers and share ideas and solutions designed for turning on your muse’s light switch. We’ll also practice writing in high pressure moments that contribute to stalled writing.
  • Creating the Location Mystery Subgenre: Creative writing is, well, creative. With this topic, I share the tips and techniques I used when starting the NOLA series, that allowed me to add life to location, quality to character.
  • Using Online Research Effectively: New writers often find themselves at opposing ends of the research spectrum. They either go with just the facts, or embellish too much. There is a way to facts and resources to create the believable world your story takes place in. I offer tools and insights for you to find that perfect balance.
  • Ministry, not Marketing: Too often we’re trapped in the whirlwind of trying to make sales. Your writing needs some TLC, and so does your audience. Whether you’re writing fiction, Bible studies, or DIY craft blog, this will give you guidance to shift focus from your product to the overall project: using your gifts to minister to—not manipulate—your audience.
  • Perfectly Painful: In the world of social media, some people are too afraid to be open and honest, and so consistently present either a Pollyanna world or the depths of despair. This topic is designed to help participants (primarily bloggers and devotional writers, but open to all) understand the difference between sharing their struggles and just venting. It will also direct them to recognize and develop the healthy balance that attracts followers by sharing painful stories with courage and confidence that even if the outcome is bad, our God is always good.
  • Doing It Wrong To Get It Write (Breaking Rules of Creative Writing): Designed to explore the rules of the writing world and give participants ideas of what works and what doesn’t in their own writing journeys. There are many rules to writing that should be followed. There are also some that can be broken. As a creative fiction writer, I found my greatest successes through writing outside the lines, and want to encourage others to do so as well. The trick is to write well, and find your market.

For more information, click here to complete my SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT SURVEY.

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